TheUS50.com Homepage HomeAbout UsContact UsSponsorship October 24, 2014  
Visit
History Historic Figures Information Geography Outdoors Tourism Governors Cities Colleges State Quiz State Links FAST FACTS FREE Wallpaper Fun & Games Tell A Friend Website Map Links of Interest
Home  >  Alaska  >  Outdoors

Alaska State Flag

State of Alaska

Outdoors

Alaska State Map Icon
Alaska State collage of images.

Select an outdoor activity
State Parks
Camping and Hiking
Hunting and Fishing
Other Outdoor activities


Alaska State Parks

Shuyak Island State Park
Shuyak Island State Park comprises most of the island's 47,000 acres. The park encompasses part of a coastal forest system, unique to the Kodiak Archipelago, which contains only one tree species: Sitka spruce. Besides a virgin Sitka spruce forest, the park includes miles of rugged coastline, beaches and protected waterways. The island is located 54 air miles north of Kodiak, Alaska. Shuyak Island's compact dimensions measure 12 miles long and 11 miles wide but contain more sheltered interior waterways than anywhere in the Kodiak Archipelago. The land and water of the area host an infinite variety of seabirds. Otters share the sea with whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and Dall porpoises. Kodiak brown bear and Sitka black-tailed deer inhabit the island's forests. For information call: (907)486-6339
[Return to top]

Denali State Park
Denali State Park is an integral part of one of North America's most spectacularly beautiful regions. The park's 325,240 acres, almost one-half the size of Rhode Island, provide the visitor with a great variety of recreational opportunities, ranging from roadside camping to wilderness exploration. The park is about 100 air miles north of Anchorage and is divided roughly in half by the George Parks Highway, the major road link between Anchorage and Fairbanks. Situated between the Talkeetna Mountains to the east and the Alaska Range to the west, the landscape varies from meandering lowland streams to alpine tundra. Dominating this diverse terrain are Curry and Kesugi Ridges, a 35 mile-long north/south alpine ridge, the backbone of the eastern half of the park. "Kesugi" is a Tanaina Indian dialect word meaning "The Ancient One" and is a fitting complement of the Tanana Indian word "Denali" which means "The High One". Denali is the original name for Mt. McKinley. At 20,320 feet, Mt. McKinley is North America's highest peak. And literally and figuratively towers over Southcentral Alaska from its base in Denali National Park. Denali State Park was established in 1970 and expanded to its present size in 1976. Its western boundary is shared with a much larger neighbor, Denali National Park and Preserve, formerly Mt. McKinley National Park. For information call: (907)745-3975
[Return to top]

Point Bridget State Park
This beautiful 2,850 acre state park, located forty miles north of Juneau, offers meadows, cliffs, spectacular views, salmon spawning streams, rocky beaches, and the sea. In the winter the meadows and open forest allow for excellent skiing and snowshoeing opportunities. Point Bridget State Park was created in 1988 by Alaska State Legislature. This was the culmination of a decade and a half of effort by recreations, conservationists and the Juneau Area State Parks Advisory Board to have a state park for the state capitol. For information call: (907)269-8400
[Return to top]

Wood-Tikchik State Park
Named for its two separate systems of large, interconnected, clear water lakes, the park is characterized by its water based ecosystems. Bordered by the Nushagak lowlands on the east and the Wood River Mountains to the west, the lake systems span a variety of terrain and vegetative zones renowned for their diverse beauty. Spired peaks, high alpine valleys, and deep v-shaped arms give the lakes' western reaches a spectacular fjord-like appearance. The eastern edges of the lakes look out upon islands, gravel beaches, and the expansive tundra of the Nushagak lowlands. The lakes, varying in length from 15 to 45 miles, are deep and temperate, with water temperatures ranging from 40°F to 60°F throughout the summer season. The park lies in a biological transition zone between coniferous forest and tundra. In general, white spruce and mixed spruce-birch forest, as well as muskeg and willow-alder thickets exist up to approximately the 900-foot elevation. Above this are bare rock, heath tundra, and alpine meadow. At the lowest elevations, wet tundra and marshlands are common. For information call: (907) 269-8698
[Return to top]

Ft. Abercrombie State Historical Park
Remnants of a WWII military installation, foot trails leading to a rugged coastline, and a lake stocked with rainbow trout and grayling, are but a few of the attractions at this seaside park. The campsites at Ft. Abercrombie are designed primarily for tent campers. R.V. campers are encouraged to use the overflow parking area. A group recreation site with covered picnic area is available with a prepaid reservation. Kodiak State Parks Headquarters and Visitor Center are located here. For information call: (907)486-6339
[Return to top]


Camping and Hiking in Alaska

Caines Head State Recreation Area and Resurrection Bay State Marine Parks
Caines Head State Recreation Area, the scenic site of an abandoned World War II fort, can be reached by boat or foot from Seward. The massive headland rises 650 feet above Resurrection Bay, against a back drop of rolling alpine meadows and sharp peaks, giving way to a sweeping view of the North Pacific Ocean. The shale-covered, forest-framed beaches of Caines Head have long been stopping points for boaters and fisherman. But early in World War II, as the territory of Alaska was attacked and occupied by Imperial Japanese ground forces, Caines Head and other Resurrection Bay vantages became strategic spots for defending the Port of Seward. The port was the southern terminus of the Alaska Railroad, a critical supply line for the war effort and for Alaskans. Visitors are invited to explore the remains of Fort McGilvray, the South Beach Garrison and the many natural attractions of this 6,000 acre state recreation area. For information call: (907)262-5581
[Return to top]

Thumb Cove SMP
Thumb Cove SMP is one of the bay's most scenic and popular anchorage. The spectacular rock faces and waterfalls of this cove offer the mariner a peaceful respite from the bay's afternoon wind and waves. This marine park has two public use cabins for rent, Porcupine Glacier and Spruce Glacier cabins. The Spruce Glacier cabin is fully wheelchair . For information call: (907)262-5581
[Return to top]

Nancy Lake State Recreation Area
Nancy Lake State Recreation Area is different from most Alaskan park areas. It is one of the few flat, lake-studded landscapes in Alaska preserved for recreation purposes. The recreation area's clear waters are ringed with unspoiled forests, and provide tranquil settings for canoeing, fishing, hiking and camping. In winter, the rolling topography is ideal for cross-country skiing, dog mushing and snowmachining. For information call: (907)269-8400
[Return to top]

Point Bridget State Park
This beautiful 2,850 acre state park, located forty miles north of Juneau, offers meadows, cliffs, spectacular views, salmon spawning streams, rocky beaches, and the sea. In the winter the meadows and open forest allow for excellent skiing and snowshoeing opportunities. Point Bridget State Park was created in 1988 by Alaska State Legislature. This was the culmination of a decade and a half of effort by recreations, conservationists and the Juneau Area State Parks Advisory Board to have a state park for the state capitol. Hiking trails consist of: Point Bridget Trail - 3.5 miles one way - allow 7 hours hiking time for round trip, Trappers Route - 2.5 miles from Camping Cove to North Bridget Cove, Historic McMurchie Cat Road - From Akiyama Bight 1.2 miles to Upper Cowee Meadow and the Point Bridget Trail (unmaintained - not recommended for summer use) and North Bridget Cove Trail - 1/4 mile to beach. For information call: (907)269-8400
[Return to top]

Kenai River Special Management Area
The Kenai River boasts major runs of four Pacific salmon species - king, red, silver and pink - in addition to trophy-sized rainbow trout and Dolly Varden. Kenai River kings, or Chinook salmon, are among the largest North Pacific salmon, often weighing from 50 to over 85 pounds. The abundant productivity of the Kenai River and variety of habitats enables the area to support large concentrations of bald eagles and many species of migratory waterfowl. Moose, caribou, wolves, bears and other wildlife also use the river system's resources. The area offers prime opportunities for fishing, boating, camping and wildlife observation. The Kenai River Special Management Area (SMA) consists of more than 105 linear miles of rivers and lakes, including Kenai Lake, Skilak Lake, and the Kenai River from river mile 82 downstream to four miles above the river's mouth on Cook Inlet. Adjacent to these waters are fifteen state park sub-units and land owned by cities, the borough and the federal government, as well as private and native lands. For information call: (907)262-5581
[Return to top]


Hunting and Fishing in Alaska

Shuyak Island State Park
Shuyak Island State Park comprises most of the island's 47,000 acres. The park encompasses part of a coastal forest system, unique to the Kodiak Archipelago, which contains only one tree species: Sitka spruce. Besides a virgin Sitka spruce forest, the park includes miles of rugged coastline, beaches and protected waterways. The island is located 54 air miles north of Kodiak, Alaska. Shuyak Island's compact dimensions measure 12 miles long and 11 miles wide but contain more sheltered interior waterways than anywhere in the Kodiak Archipelago. The land and water of the area host an infinite variety of seabirds. Otters share the sea with whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and Dall porpoises. Kodiak brown bear and Sitka black-tailed deer inhabit the island's forests. For information call: (907)486-6339
[Return to top]

Afognak Island State Park
This 48,742 acre park is located on the east side of Afognak Island. Visitors can hunt, fish, hike, or just enjoy the pristine environment. Alpine areas can be reached from the lake in one to two hours of hiking through a spruce forest that surrounds the lakeshore and reaches to about 700' elevation. Dolly Varden are present in Pillar Lake. A three-hour hike (experienced wilderness hikers only) to the lake directly south of Big Tonki Bay provides access to salmon fishing. For information call:(907)486-6339
[Return to top]

Captain Cook State Recreation Area
Captain Cook State Recreation Area offers a variety of recreation activities, from canoeing and boating on Stormy Lake to beachcombing on Cook Inlet's tide-swept shores, bird watching, berry picking, and wildlife observation. The beaches are popular with agate hunters. Anglers may enjoy fishing for rainbow trout and silver salmon in Swanson River as well as rainbows and arctic char in Stormy Lake. Current fishing regulations will give complete information on seasons and limits. Winter visitors enjoy ice fishing on Stormy Lake. Wildlife you may see during your visit includes moose, bear, coyote, wolves, Beluga whales, harbor seals, beaver, muskrat, bald eagles, sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, arctic and common loons, golden-eye ducks, mergansers, thrushes, warblers, and jays. For information call: (907)262-5581
[Return to top]

Clam Gulch State Recreation Area
Clam Gulch, as the name implies, is famous for the hundreds of thousands of razor clams harvested annually from the sandy beaches adjacent to the State Recreation Area. Situated on the bluffs overlooking scenic Cook Inlet, the recreation area offers visitors a panoramic view of the Aleutian Mountain Range and its three tallest peaks - Mount Iliamna, Mount Redoubt and Mount Spurr. Wildlife in the area includes moose, bald eagles, gulls and many small birds and mammals. A wide variety of wild flowers may also be found within the recreation area, including the lupine, Jacob's ladder, wild geranium and the prickly rose. For information call: (907)262-5581
[Return to top]

Nancy Lake State Recreation Area
Nancy Lake State Recreation Area is different from most Alaskan park areas. It is one of the few flat, lake-studded landscapes in Alaska preserved for recreation purposes. The recreation area's clear waters are ringed with unspoiled forests, and provide tranquil settings for canoeing, fishing, hiking and camping. In winter, the rolling topography is ideal for cross-country skiing, dog mushing and snowmachining. For information call: (907)269-8400
[Return to top]


Other Alaska Outdoor activities

Alaska also offers the following outdoor activities:
  • Boating
  • Climbing
  • Cross Country Skiing
  • Horseback Riding
  • Sailing
  • Skiing
  • Snow Mobiling
  • Snow Shoeing
  • Swimming

[Return to top]






History | Historic Figures | Geography | Outdoors | Tourism | Events | Information | Governors | Cities | Colleges | Quiz | State Links
Copyright © 1998-2014 TheUS50.com | Online Policies | Site Design By: Erik Schubach